Publishing a Peer-Reviewed Book on Experimental Legal Education Co-edited by the Hebron University Dean of Law College

Publishing a Peer-Reviewed Book on Experimental Legal Education Co-edited by the Hebron University Dean of Law School


Dean of Hebron University College of Law and Political Science, Dr. Mutaz M. Qafisheh, has published a co-edited book entitled "Experimental Legal Education in a Globalized World: The Middle East & Beyond" (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle, UK, 2016, 540 pages). The book is co-edited with Prof. Stephen A. Rosenbaum, John & Elizabeth Boalt Lecturer, University of California, Berkeley School of Law, and clinical skills instructor, USA.
 
This peer-reviewed book focuses on practical legal education, particularly clinical education, field work, street law, pro bono service, legal advice, simulations, placements/internships, moot courts and mock trials, problem-based learning, case analysis, group work, role-play, and brainstorming. The book incorporates 28 chapters written by 34 scholars from most continents. Writers come from countries in the Global South and Global North; all are concerned with the advancement of legal education, to make it more interactive, and to contribute to bridging the gap between the powerful and powerless communities.
 
Contributors to the book are the following (order as in chapter sequence of the book): Frank S. Bloch, Yuval Elbashan, Jeff Giddings, Nisreen Mahasneh, George Critchlow, Stephen A. Rosenbaum, Camilia S. Camal, Mary Pat Treuthart, Sahar Maranlou, Richard Grimes, Assaf Likhovski, Mutaz M. Qafisheh, Nael Ghannam, Natalie Rea, Nicole Taylor, Deena R. Hurwitz, Sanford R. Silverburg, David F. Chavkin, David McQuoid-Mason, Onuora-Oguno Azubike, Kevwe M. Omoragbon, Shuvro P. Sarker, Rebecca Parker, Jan-Gero A. Hannemann, Jan Lampe, Judith Büschleb, Julian Udich, Katarzyna Gromek-Broc, Richard Hedlund, Richard Foster, Donald Nicolson, Shadi A. Alshdaifat, Anand K. Tripathi, and Jacopo Terrosi.
 
The book is mainly the outcome of the international conference organized by Hebron University Legal Clinics from 1 to 3 October 2013 entitled "Global Legal Education Approaches: Experiences for Palestine". The two editors, who met at the GAJE conference in Delhi in December 2013, decided to enlarge the book's scope beyond Palestine and the Middle East.
 
The book argues that legal education is undergoing a paradigm shift. Traditional law instruction, the lecturing and memorizing, have become a fading fashion. Legal clinics are cropping up. Law students seek to practice while studying and can contribute to social justice as part of the educational process. Students no longer accept one-way interaction from their professors. They want interaction with their peers in various corners of the globe. The Middle East is no exception. Legal clinics can be found in most countries of the region. However, there is scant literature on legal education in the region, particularly clinical education. This book aims to fill in the gap and offers comparative cases that might benefit legal educators and justice practitioners in the Middle East and elsewhere. The region needs reform in all dimensions: political, economic, social, religious, legal, and educational. Legal education lies at the heart of such reforms. The book examines legal education within selected locations in the region, underscoring successful pedagogical models from various parts of the world.
 
To see an overview on the book and to order a copy of it, see:
http://www.cambridgescholars.com/experimental-legal-education-in-a-globalized-world
 
To read the book's introduction, table of contents and bios of the editors and contributors, see:
http://www.cambridgescholars.com/download/sample/63272